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Schwartz Biomedical Sells BioDuct® Assets to Stryker Orthopaedics

Posted: Jul 15th, 2009
FORT WAYNE, IN —BioAvascular Solutions LLC (formerly known as BioDuct LLC), a Schwartz Biomedical subsidiary, announces the sale of BioDuct® assets to Stryker Howmedica Osteonics (Stryker Orthopaedics) of Mahwah, New Jersey. BioAvascular Solutions previously announced that it had received clearance from the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) on its BioDuct® meniscal device. According to Dr. Herb Schwartz, president of BioAvascular Solutions and Schwartz Biomedical, “We are very excited to have Stryker Orthopaedics launch this technology into the market. Stryker is an excellent strategic partner and will provide the enhanced distribution and marketing expertise for BioDuct® products. With their broad and experienced sales force and market presence, our confidence is high that the right surgeons will have access to this technology and patients can ultimately receive the benefit.”

The patented BioDuct® technology allows orthopaedic surgeons to repair the shock absorbing cartilage (meniscus) in the knee instead of removing it. Prior to the BioDuct® device, surgeons had no option but to excise the damaged portions of the meniscus, and this, unfortunately for the patient, can lead to (osteo)arthritis and even total knee replacement.

"The BioDuct® Meniscal Repair Device has the potential to be a landscape changer,” according to Frank Proch, Manager of Engineering for Schwartz Biomedical and BioAvascular Solutions. “It provides an elegant solution to one of the most common orthopaedic injuries and can significantly alter the algorithm surgeons use for meniscus injuries.”

As a result of this transaction, BioDuct LLC has changed its name to BioAvascular Solutions LLC and will retain the rights to certain applications of the technology.

About Schwartz Biomedical
Schwartz Biomedical, LLC, is an orthopaedic tissue engineering company located in the Northeast Indiana Innovation Center in Fort Wayne, Indiana. The company innovates and develops novel tissue engineering solutions for orthopaedic problems.
Web site: www.schwartzbiomedical.com

About Stryker Corporation
Stryker Corporation is one of the world's leading medical technology companies with the most broadly based range of products in orthopaedics and a significant presence in other medical specialties. Stryker works with respected medical professionals to help people lead more active and more satisfying lives. The Company's products include implants used in joint replacement, trauma, craniomaxillofacial and spinal surgeries; biologics; surgical, neurologic, ear, nose & throat and interventional pain equipment; and endoscopic, surgical navigation, communications and digital imaging systems; as well as patient handling and emergency medical equipment.
For more information about Stryker, please visit the company web site at www.stryker.com.

Source: Schwartz Biomedical, LLC 3201 Stellhorn Road Fort Wayne, IN 46815 Phone: 260-407-6468 Fax: 260-492-0452 Web: www.schwartzbiomedical.com Stryker Orthopaedics Contact: Aaron Kwittken Kwittken & Company t: (646) 747-7144 ddamoulakis@kwitco.com

Biological Device Could Repair Knee Damage Better than Before

Posted: May 01st, 2007
COLUMBIA, Mo. - The meniscus is described as the shock absorber of the knee. Without the meniscus, cartilage wears out quickly, bone rubs on bone and arthritis is almost guaranteed to develop. Unfortunately, when certain parts of this shock absorber are damaged, they don't regenerate, or even heal, and doctors are forced to remove the damaged portion. In the near future, this may not happen thanks to a collaboration between a University of Missouri-Columbia researcher and a company called BioDuct, LLC, a subsidiary of the tissue engineering company, Schwartz Biomedical.

Most of the meniscus is avascular, meaning that it doesn't have a good blood supply and therefore doesn't heal well. Doctors call this portion of the meniscus the "white zone." The "red zone" of the meniscus is well vascularized tissue and can be repaired in certain situations. The new device, called BioDuct¿ Meniscal Repair Device, transports blood from the red zone to the white zone, giving that portion of the meniscus a chance to heal when it has been damaged. The use of BioDuct is close to FDA approval for widespread use.

"This is a landscape changer for the sports medicine industry and will have a large effect on how surgeons approach meniscal tears in the future," said Herb Schwartz, president and CEO of Schwartz Biomedical, LLC. "If someone has a chronic tear and the tissue is still viable, this device will provide access to blood and cells as the body tries to repair it."

Schwartz collaborated with James Cook, an MU professor of veterinary medicine and surgery, to develop BioDuct and the surgical procedure to implant it. Once BioDuct is implanted into the knee, it provides blood to the affected region of the meniscus. BioDuct is a bioabsorbable material, so after a period of time when the healing process is complete, the body breaks down the device and gets rid of it naturally.

"This device will not only help humans with these tears, but could help many animals as well," Cook said. "In the past, when someone had a tear, it was only a matter of time before palliative pain management was the only treatment option. Now, we have new ways of repairing the tissues in the joint and keeping it healthy for many years."

Schwartz said that while the device can be fitted in anyone who has a meniscal tear, certain health factors, such as being grossly overweight and smoking, could affect how well the tissue heals.

Cook has reported his findings on BioDuct at the Orthopaedic Research Society, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, International Cartilage Repair Society and Veterinary Orthopaedic Society meetings.

source: http://www.sflorg.com/comm_center/unv_medical/p91_19.html

New Device Could Improve Prognosis for Damaged Knees

Posted: May 01st, 2007
COLUMBIA, Mo. -- The meniscus is described as the shock absorber of the knee. Without the meniscus, cartilage wears out quickly, bone rubs on bone and arthritis is almost guaranteed to develop. Unfortunately, when certain parts of this shock absorber are damaged, they don't regenerate, or even heal, and doctors are forced to remove the damaged portion. In the near future, this may not happen thanks to a collaboration between a University of Missouri-Columbia researcher and a company called BioDuct, LLC, a subsidiary of the tissue engineering company, Schwartz Biomedical.

Most of the meniscus is avascular, meaning that it doesn't have a good blood supply and therefore doesn't heal well. Doctors call this portion of the meniscus the "white zone." The "red zone" of the meniscus is well vascularized tissue and can be repaired in certain situations. The new device, called BioDuct Meniscal Repair Device, transports blood from the red zone to the white zone, giving that portion of the meniscus a chance to heal when it has been damaged. The use of BioDuct is close to FDA approval for widespread use.

"This is a landscape changer for the sports medicine industry and will have a large effect on how surgeons approach meniscal tears in the future," said Herb Schwartz, president and CEO of Schwartz Biomedical, LLC. "If someone has a chronic tear and the tissue is still viable, this device will provide access to blood and cells as the body tries to repair it."

Schwartz collaborated with James Cook, an MU professor of veterinary medicine and surgery, to develop BioDuct and the surgical procedure to implant it. Once BioDuct is implanted into the knee, it provides blood to the affected region of the meniscus. BioDuct is a bioabsorbable material, so after a period of time when the healing process is complete, the body breaks down the device and gets rid of it naturally.

"This device will not only help humans with these tears, but could help many animals as well," Cook said. "In the past, when someone had a tear, it was only a matter of time before palliative pain management was the only treatment option. Now, we have new ways of repairing the tissues in the joint and keeping it healthy for many years."

Schwartz said that while the device can be fitted in anyone who has a meniscal tear, certain health factors, such as being grossly overweight and smoking, could affect how well the tissue heals.

Cook has reported his findings on BioDuct at the Orthopaedic Research Society, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, International Cartilage Repair Society and Veterinary Orthopaedic Society meetings.

source: http://research.missouri.edu/news/stories/060818_cook.htm